The Drama of Life

The word ‘drama’ means ‘men in action’. The Greek philosopher Aristotle established ‘drama’ to mean a theatrical performance.

A theatre community enables a drama to happen. A team of people work together –actors, technicians, those responsible for costumes, scenery…

We live and work in communities, bringing skills and talents to the benefit of all. In community we are at our best – thinking of others, contributing, caring.

The Set is the world created on the stage. Helped by lighting and scenery the drama comes to life.

The set of our community drama is our work places, neighbourhoods, churches, friendship groups…

Actors have two sides – the role they play on-stage and the person they are off-stage. In the drama of life there must be consistency and integrity between our role and our person.

Audience is vital to all performances. A performance cannot exist in isolation. The audience observes, appreciates, analyses and passes judgement.

The dramatic form:

Tragedy confronts our most difficult experiences: death, loss, injustice, denied love, despair. In tragedy there is division, destruction and hopelessness.

Comedy approaches the world playfully – but can also make difficult aspects of life and death accessible. Characters work together. Even in tragic circumstances there can be resolution, healing, unity and hope.

Musing….

I’m an actor: I’m not a solo act. I work with fellow actors. Others support me in my community. I’m also ‘me’. There must be integrity between the two.

I have an audience: the drama of my life is observed by an outside world; my audience includes other actors from my community who may be more critical.

I’m in a comedy: my Christian faith enables me to face tragic situations. Inescapable difficulties, death and despair are often there. In the Christian narrative wrongs are always righted and justice is always established. There is resolution, reconciliation and redemption. Faith brings hope.

2 thoughts on “The Drama of Life

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: